Staff Insights

Tokenization, in the context of NatGold, is aptly termed “digital gold mining” because it transforms the concept of mining by moving the process from the physical world to the digital sphere. This innovative approach represents certified gold resources as digital tokens, known as NatGold coins, on a blockchain. Unlike traditional gold, these digital tokens can be traded, sold, or held as investments, mirroring the functionality of physical gold but eliminating the environmental degradation associated with gold mining.

By enabling the virtual exchange and holding of gold resources, this method pioneers a sustainable, efficient, and ESG-friendly avenue for harnessing the monetary benefits of gold. It sidesteps the need for physical extraction, offering a contemporary solution that aligns with global sustainability goals. The term “digital gold mining” thus encapsulates this modern process, highlighting a shift towards a more responsible and innovative way to value and interact with gold in the digital economy.

FAQs

Who is OroEx Corp., and what is their role within the NatGold ecosystem?2024-04-21T19:10:09+00:00

OroEx Corp., based in New York, NY, is the founder and exclusive operator of the NatGold ecosystem, a comprehensive hybrid ledger/blockchain-based platform that facilitates the tokenization, storage, distribution, and global trading of NatGold coins within a DeFi framework. OroEx ensures that all components of its operations are fully auditable, transparent, and strategically managed.

The NatGold ecosystem encompasses several key components:

NatGold Digital Vault: Actively facilitates the tokenization process and safeguards all related documentation by securely recording and managing tokenized assets.

NatGold Bilateral Bridge: Facilitates seamless interactions between the ledger system and blockchain networks.

NatGold Multichain: Supports the global distribution, storage, and trading of NatGold coins.

NatGold Media DApp: Delivers continuous communication and updates on the NatGold industry within the DeFi universe, keeping stakeholders informed and engaged.

Each component works in concert to ensure a secure, transparent, and regulatory compliant environment, making the NatGold ecosystem the essence of the global NatGold industry.

Isn’t silver considered to have monetary utility, similar to gold? What happens when there are certified silver resources in addition to the primary deposit of certified gold resources? Is the silver given any gold equivalent value?2024-05-01T17:22:10+00:00

It’s extremely common for a gold deposit to include significant amounts of other metals—both precious and otherwise—alongside the gold. Silver is one such metal that frequently occurs with gold and has a rich monetary tradition alongside its “big monetary brother.”

Silver has always played an important monetary role throughout history. Sometimes referred to as the “common man’s gold,” silver was historically used for more routine commercial transactions of a smaller nature, whereas gold fulfilled larger transactions. The true monetary history of the world is bimetallic: gold and silver.

One significant difference between gold and silver is that over time, the monetary utility of silver became overshadowed by industrial usage, which accounts for about 60% of its utility. Thus, its monetary utility is no longer its primary utility, whereas with gold, its store of wealth utility remains its primary function.

Because silver plays an important role in the global investment world, with as much as 40% of its demand for investment and store of wealth purposes, it is important to recognize their value. Therefore, in models like NatGold, certified silver resources are valued on their gold equivalent ratio basis. This means that the NI 43-101 certified silver resource is converted into its gold equivalent value within the same resource category; inferred, indicated, or measured resources.

It is important to note that NatGold’s legislative policies are focused on gold as the primary element of tokenization. The silver resources to which we are referring would be a by-product resource that occurs along with the primary certified gold resource.

What are U.S. Patented Land Claims?2024-04-21T13:06:18+00:00

U.S. Patented Land Claims are a unique type of property right established under the General Mining Act of 1872, designed to promote the exploration and extraction of mineral resources on public lands. These claims grant full ownership of both surface and subsurface rights to the claimant, allowing for comprehensive control over the mining and management of mineral resources. Originally issued by the General Land Office—now known as the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)—these claims provided a mechanism for individuals and companies to secure land for mining, playing a pivotal role in the development of the American West.

As privately held assets, U.S. Patented Land Claims include both the surface and subsurface mineral rights, distinguishing them from public lands where mining rights are typically leased or licensed. This ownership model facilitates complete autonomy in the exploration, development, and extraction processes, making these claims particularly valuable for the tokenization of physical gold resources into digital NatGold coins. Although the issuance of new mineral patents was significantly curtailed by a moratorium enacted in 1994, existing claims that met all the requirements before this enactment are still in effect, offering a vital pathway for the digital mining of gold through tokenization in the evolving landscape of the NatGold industry.

Why is the elimination of fees and royalties crucial in NatGold legislation?2024-05-03T15:33:15+00:00

To ensure the NatGold industry’s integrity and sustainability, it’s critical to eliminate ongoing state fees and royalties tied to traditional mining titles. Such ongoing annual costs, if applied, necessitate the issuance of new NatGold coins to cover them, risking the one-to-one correspondence between NatGold coins and certified gold resources. This could potentially dilute NatGold coins’ monetary integrity by introducing the possibility of devaluation within the ecosystem. Therefore, abolishing these fees and royalties is paramount to preserving NatGold coins as a reliable and devaluation-resistant store of value, safeguarding against the depreciation that could arise from ongoing state-imposed costs.

What does ESG stand for?2024-04-21T15:19:38+00:00

ESG stands for Environmental, Social, and Governance. These three broad categories are used to evaluate the sustainability and ethical impact of an investment in a company or business. Here’s what each component generally focuses on:

Environmental criteria consider how a company performs as a steward of nature. This includes its energy use, waste, pollution, natural resource conservation, and treatment of animals. The criteria can also help evaluate any environmental risks a company might face and how the company is managing those risks.

Social criteria examine how it manages relationships with employees, suppliers, customers, and the communities where it operates. This can include labor practices, employee health and safety, and the company’s impact on the communities where it operates.

Governance deals with a company’s leadership, executive pay, audits, internal controls, and shareholder rights. This aspect looks into how a company is governed, particularly in terms of transparency, accountability, and business ethics.

These factors are increasingly important to investors, as they can affect a company’s profitability, risk profile, and overall sustainability.