Staff Insights

NatGold, sometimes referred to as “green gold,” represents the concept of monetizing natural gold—gold that is left unextracted and remains in the ground. The distinctiveness of NatGold lies in the method of capturing its value, making it a superior choice for monetary purposes compared to its above-ground counterpart, which serves better for industrial, jewelry, and luxury uses.

The value of NatGold is realized through the tokenization of NI 43-101 certified gold resources, which are fundamental to all investment decisions related to gold mine financing for extraction purposes. By being digitally mined and kept in its natural state, NatGold provides a plentiful supply to meet flexible monetary demands without the need for the security, storage, transportation, and insurance required for physical gold.

Moreover, NatGold is ESG-friendly (Environmental, Social, and Governance), positioning NatGold as a positive force for sustainable finance, in stark contrast to the significant environmental and social impacts associated with above-ground gold extraction and processing.

FAQs

How significantly has Canada’s NI 43-101 Technical Report influenced the design of CRIRSCO’s International Reporting Template (IRT)?2024-04-20T23:41:36+00:00

Canada’s National Instrument 43-101 (NI 43-101) has had a significant influence on the design of CRIRSCO’s International Reporting Template (IRT). Developed by the Canadian Securities Administrators, NI 43-101 sets stringent guidelines for the public disclosure of scientific and technical information related to mineral projects, which emphasize transparency, accountability, and detailed reporting. The comprehensive nature of NI 43-101, particularly its rigorous requirements for Qualified Persons and its structured approach to defining mineral resources and reserves, served as a model for many of the principles incorporated into the IRT.

This influence ensures that the IRT aligns with the high standards of reporting established by NI 43-101, facilitating consistency and comparability among international mining reports and aiding in the global harmonization of mineral resource and reserve reporting standards. This alignment is crucial for fostering trust and confidence among investors and regulators in the mining industry worldwide.

What does ESG stand for?2024-04-21T15:19:38+00:00

ESG stands for Environmental, Social, and Governance. These three broad categories are used to evaluate the sustainability and ethical impact of an investment in a company or business. Here’s what each component generally focuses on:

Environmental criteria consider how a company performs as a steward of nature. This includes its energy use, waste, pollution, natural resource conservation, and treatment of animals. The criteria can also help evaluate any environmental risks a company might face and how the company is managing those risks.

Social criteria examine how it manages relationships with employees, suppliers, customers, and the communities where it operates. This can include labor practices, employee health and safety, and the company’s impact on the communities where it operates.

Governance deals with a company’s leadership, executive pay, audits, internal controls, and shareholder rights. This aspect looks into how a company is governed, particularly in terms of transparency, accountability, and business ethics.

These factors are increasingly important to investors, as they can affect a company’s profitability, risk profile, and overall sustainability.

Why are NI 43-101 Technical Reports automatically accepted by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under Regulation S-K 1300, whereas technical reports from other nations are not?2024-04-20T23:32:08+00:00

NI 43-101 Technical Reports are automatically accepted by the SEC under Regulation S-K 1300 due to their strict adherence to the regulation’s rigorous standards, which prioritize detailed, transparent, and reliable disclosures of mineral resources and reserves. These reports are developed by the Canadian Securities Administrators and set a high standard for the public disclosure of scientific and technical information concerning mineral projects. This includes stringent requirements for the qualifications and responsibilities of “Qualified Persons” who verify the reports, ensuring that the disclosed information is both accurate and verifiable.

In contrast, reports from other standards like JORC (Australia) or SAMREC (South Africa) might require additional reconciliation to align with S-K 1300. While these standards are internationally aligned to the CRIRSCO templates, which share common core definitions and guidelines with S-K 1300, they often have slight variations in definitions and reporting criteria. These differences mean that technical reports from these and other non-Canadian jurisdictions may need to demonstrate their compliance with S-K 1300’s specific requirements through detailed reconciliation, making them not automatically acceptable like NI 43-101 reports.

What are NatGold Miners?2024-05-03T15:38:38+00:00

NatGold Miners, often called natural gold or green gold miners, are primarily gold exploration companies or producers that focus on developing new or acquiring existing gold deposits with National Instrument 43-101 (NI 43-101) certified resources. Operating within jurisdictions with NatGold legislation, their main activity is “swapping or exchanging” mining titles for an equivalent quantity of NatGold coins through tokenization. This method bypasses traditional gold mining by utilizing legal frameworks that allow the digital tokenization of in-ground gold resources. Consequently, these resources are mined digitally in an ESG-friendly manner, avoiding the negative environmental and social impacts typically associated with physical extraction. This process effectively unlocks gold’s monetary value without the detrimental effects. NatGold Miners are instrumental in the expansion of the NatGold ecosystem, fostering the sustainable and digital monetization of gold resources.

Do U.S. Patented Land Claims include both surface and subsurface rights, and can these rights be severed to eliminate property tax obligations? Why is this important for NatGold tokenization?2024-04-21T13:18:45+00:00

U.S. Patented Land Claims typically include both surface and subsurface rights, granting the owner full control over the entire property. However, it is possible for these rights to be severed, meaning that the surface rights and subsurface mineral rights can be owned separately. This process involves legally separating the ownership of the surface land from the mineral rights beneath it.

Once severed, the subsurface mineral rights can be sold, leased, or retained independently of the surface rights. This allows different parties to own and manage these distinct interests separately. Severing rights is a legal process that must comply with state and federal laws, and it often involves formal agreements and registrations to clearly define the split in ownership.

Severing the subsurface rights from the surface rights can be particularly advantageous for several reasons. For one, it allows the owner to retain the valuable subsurface mineral rights while potentially selling or leasing the surface land. More importantly, from a financial perspective, separating these rights can significantly impact the financial obligations associated with the property. In the context of U.S. Patented Land Claims, the only financial obligation typically tied to unified ownership is property taxes, which, though often minimal, still represent a recurring cost.

For tokenization purposes in the NatGold ecosystem, where no ongoing fees are acceptable to avoid devaluation of the NatGold coins from their 100% certified gold resource backing, it is imperative for owners to sever the subsurface rights containing the certified gold resources. By doing so, they effectively separate these rights from the surface rights, thus severing the title from any ongoing property taxes. This separation ensures that the subsurface rights, now free from the burden of property taxes, remain a pure asset backed solely by the certified resources they contain, ideal for use within the NatGold framework.