Staff Insights

U.S. Patented Land Claims typically include both surface and subsurface rights, granting the owner full control over the entire property. However, it is possible for these rights to be severed, meaning that the surface rights and subsurface mineral rights can be owned separately. This process involves legally separating the ownership of the surface land from the mineral rights beneath it.

Once severed, the subsurface mineral rights can be sold, leased, or retained independently of the surface rights. This allows different parties to own and manage these distinct interests separately. Severing rights is a legal process that must comply with state and federal laws, and it often involves formal agreements and registrations to clearly define the split in ownership.

Severing the subsurface rights from the surface rights can be particularly advantageous for several reasons. For one, it allows the owner to retain the valuable subsurface mineral rights while potentially selling or leasing the surface land. More importantly, from a financial perspective, separating these rights can significantly impact the financial obligations associated with the property. In the context of U.S. Patented Land Claims, the only financial obligation typically tied to unified ownership is property taxes, which, though often minimal, still represent a recurring cost.

For tokenization purposes in the NatGold ecosystem, where no ongoing fees are acceptable to avoid devaluation of the NatGold coins from their 100% certified gold resource backing, it is imperative for owners to sever the subsurface rights containing the certified gold resources. By doing so, they effectively separate these rights from the surface rights, thus severing the title from any ongoing property taxes. This separation ensures that the subsurface rights, now free from the burden of property taxes, remain a pure asset backed solely by the certified resources they contain, ideal for use within the NatGold framework.

FAQs

What is NatGold Legislation?2024-05-03T15:22:03+00:00

NatGold legislation, often referred to as natural gold or green gold legislation, is designed to amend and expand current mining laws to provide a sustainable alternative to the traditional, production-centric mining model. It enables entities within the conventional mining legal framework to convert their exploration or exploitation titles into NatGold titles. Once a title is transitioned into a NatGold mining title, it obtains a form of perpetual protection, making it exempt from production permits. Instead, these titles become eligible for tokenization, allowing them to be exchanged for NatGold coins. This innovative approach aims to preserve natural resources while still leveraging their economic value, aligning with modern environmental and sustainability goals.

What is the NatGold Bilateral Bridge?2024-04-21T19:42:36+00:00

The NatGold Bilateral Bridge is a pivotal technological infrastructure within the NatGold ecosystem, designed by OroEx Corp. to connect the private ledger of the NatGold Digital Vault with the NatGold NatGold Multichain where NatGold coins are actively stored, distributed, and traded globally. This bridge plays a critical role by facilitating the seamless and secure transfer of NatGold coins from their post-tokenization crediting in the Digital Vault to their respective public blockchain addresses.

Essential to both operational oversight and regulatory compliance, the NatGold Bilateral Bridge utilizes advanced technologies such as smart contracts, APIs, and cryptographic security measures. These tools ensure that the transfers and tracking of NatGold coins are conducted securely and efficiently, thereby preserving the integrity and trustworthiness of the digital asset management system. This infrastructure not only supports the smooth functioning of the NatGold ecosystem but also enhances its capacity for strategic decision-making and regulatory adherence.

Why does NatGold only recognize certified gold resources and not certified gold reserves when determining tokenization ratios?2024-04-20T23:34:04+00:00

The essence of NatGold’s valuation lies in its innovative approach to digital mining, which capitalizes on the inherent value of gold’s existence rather than its physical retrievability. This method relies on the assessment of certified gold resources, which quantify the presence of gold irrespective of its extraction feasibility. Conversely, certified gold reserves evaluate the economic viability of extracting these resources, a consideration irrelevant to NatGold’s mission. The International NatGold Council upholds a philosophy that sidesteps the environmentally and financially costly process of physical extraction in favor of a more sustainable, digital approach.

By choosing to tokenize gold based on its certified existence, NatGold challenges the traditional mining paradigm, rendering the debate over extraction viability moot. This shift not only aligns with environmental conservation efforts but also redefines the utility of gold as a store of wealth. It renders the act of extracting gold only to secure it in vaults both illogical and wasteful. Through digital tokenization, NatGold ensures that gold can fulfill its monetary role while remaining undisturbed in the earth, showcasing a practical commitment to ESG principles and making a clear case for the absurdity of conventional extraction methods.

What is Regulation S-K 1300? How important a role did CRIRSCO’s International Reporting Template (IRT) play in its development?2024-04-20T23:39:39+00:00

Regulation S-K 1300 is a set of regulations implemented by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to modernize and improve the disclosure and reporting standards for mining properties. It replaced the previous Industry Guide 7, aiming to align U.S. reporting requirements more closely with global standards.

CRIRSCO’s International Reporting Template (IRT) played a significant role in the development of Regulation S-K 1300. The IRT provided a framework that helped harmonize the various national and regional reporting standards into a globally accepted guideline. This alignment was crucial in informing the SEC’s approach, ensuring that S-K 1300 would facilitate greater consistency and comparability in the reporting of mineral resources and reserves, aligning it more closely with international standards and enhancing the transparency of disclosures to better serve global investors.

Why is NatGold mining considered ESG-friendly?2024-04-21T15:42:57+00:00

NatGold mining is considered environmentally, socially, and governance (ESG)-friendly because it promotes the monetization of natural gold resources without the physical extraction of gold from the earth. This innovative approach involves the tokenization of National Instrument 43-101 (NI 43-101) certified gold resources, which are kept in their natural state underground. Unlike traditional gold mining, NatGold mining does not involve the environmentally and socially detrimental activities typically associated with the extraction and processing of physical gold, such as land degradation, water pollution, and the displacement of communities.

Furthermore, NatGold mining eliminates the need for the extensive security measures, transportation, storage, and insurance required for physical gold, thereby reducing the carbon footprint and enhancing the sustainability of gold as a financial asset. By leveraging digital tokenization, NatGold provides a stable, secure, and flexible supply of monetary assets that meets modern financial system demands without the negative environmental and social impacts of traditional gold mining practices. This positions NatGold as a pivotal component in sustainable finance, offering an ESG-friendly alternative to conventional methods of gold monetization.